Quilt Club Corner


Ephemera Record: 1E-A3-9D1

Ephemera Object Description

title
Quilt Club Corner
creator
  • Crumb, Edith
InstNameF003
  • Michigan State University Museum
description
Article talking about the Nosegay quilt pattern. There are also letters from quilt club corner members, an advertisement for the first leaflet containing part of the Old-Fashioned Nosegay quilt pattern, and a membership blank to join the Quilt Club.
dateOriginal
01-02-1934
timePeriod
1930-1949
city
Detroit
state
Michigan (MI)
country
United States
source
The Detroit News
type
Text
textType
  • Newspaper clipping
language
English
InstProjNameF003a
Detroit News History Project
rights
Contact MSU Museum.
subjectlist
  • Applique
  • Block pattern
  • Hand Piecing
  • Hand quilting
  • Machinge Piecing
  • Machine quilting
  • Piecing
  • Quilt guild/quilt club

File Information Upload

fullText
How Do You Think You’ll Like It? [Photograph of Edith Crumb holding The Old-Fashioned Nosegay quilt] QUILTERS ALL, take notice. Here is the Quilt Club Director, Miss Edith B. Crumb, showing you just how the club’s new quilt, The Old-Fashioned Nosegay, is to be put together. It has 12 old-fashioned calico nosegays in the center, and little boutonniers around the border. Send for the first leaflet in the series with directions for starting the quilt. Editor of Quilt Corner Shows Nosegay Pattern. MORE than a thousand quilters have already received the first leaflet in the Detroit News Quilt Club’s new series, The Old-Fashioned Calico Nosegay Quilt. But these quilters wonder just how the finished product is going to look and how the blocks are to be put together. So here is Miss Crumb herself showing you the chart of the finished quilt with its twelve big nosegays, its wide area, where expert and beautiful quilting may be done, and its charming little nosegay scalloped border. But because this quilt can be a real work of art, the Editor wants everyone to get away to a good start. So she is saving Leaflet No. 2, with directions for making the green leaves and the charming little calico bow until next week, so that all of the quilters may send for Leaflet No. 1 this week. In this first leaflet you will find not only the pattern for the first nosegay, but a general description of the quilt, directions for getting the materials needed, and the plan of work. But all the directions in the world won’t make a truly artistic quilt. That rests with the maker, whose eye for color and for the placing of her various patterns will do much to make her quilt a real work of art. With 17 or 18 posies in every nosegay, it is easy to see that the opportunity for the exercise of personal taste and selection is very great. If you haven’t already secured Leaflet No. 1 in the Old-Fashioned Calico Nosegay series write to the Quilt Club Corner today and ask for it. The leaflet is free, but you must enclose a self-addressed stamped envelope. Leaflet No. 2 is ready and will be published next week. Leaflets may also be secured by calling at The News Public Service Bureau in the Majestic Building, the General Motors Building or the Pontiac Bank Building, Pontiac. Little Nosegays Bloom On New Quilt Twelve little prim nosegays, lightly packed with old-fashioned flowers, will form the center of the new quilt pattern now being published by The Detroit News while the border will be more than 50 single flowers. Leaflet number one, now ready, explains the general plan and brings you the pattern for the first nosegay. Write to the Quilt Club Corner today and enclose self-addressed stamped envelope if you haven’t already received leaflet number one. Copies may also be called for at The Detroit News Public Service Bureau in the Majestic Building, the General Motors Building, and the Pontiac Bank Building, Pontiac. QUILT CLUB CORNER By EDITH B. CRUMB. Yesterday I received an inquiry from a quilter who said that she wanted to make a piecework, instead of a patchwork or appliqué quilt such as the New Nosegay or the Flower Garden quilt which so many of the members made for the Quilt show. I suggested the Flying Clouds pattern which calls for a cross of diamonds and triangles in a hollow square made of square patches, or the delightful Winged Square Pattern made of triangles of white and color. Perhaps there are others who are interested in the pieced quilts. don’t forget that the club has many patterns of this kind from which to choose, if you prefer this type of quilt to the appliqué work. I AM writing for the pattern of the Trip Around the World. I attended the Quilt Exhibit and certainly enjoyed it. I especially liked the prize quilt of Mrs. Russell of Richmond, Michigan. It was the Double Irish Chain. Would a letter reach her addressed to Mrs. William Russell, Richmond, Michigan? I would like to write to her. MRS. MARY CLARE, Detroit, Michigan. The Trip Around the World pattern has been very popular since the exhibit. So many saw it and have written in for it that I am sure that there are needles and needles flying over those little two-inch squares to form that fascinating pattern. That Double Irish Chain was originally put out about five years ago and at that time it was known as Mrs. Hoover’s Colonial Quilt. There has been so much call for it that I think I will have it revised. It may be made on the straight or the diagonal. I think you will notice that there were quilts made in both ways there. If you will just address Mrs. Russell’s letter to Mrs. Wm. C. Russell, Richmond, Michigan, I am sure it will reach her and she will, no doubt, be delighted to hear from you. Here’s Another Member. I intended writing you some time ago, but since seeing the Exhibit, I couldn’t wait any longer to become a proud member of your Corner. I, to, have been very busy quilting. I made the Flower Garden, Prairie Queen, Philadelphia Pavement, and several baby quilts. In fact, I have made 20 quilts from Detroit News patterns and think them all nice. I have wanted to write, but am backward. The Exhibit and the friendliness of the members gave me courage to write. I cannot tell you how much I enjoyed the Exhibit. I spent hours there and could have stayed longer as everything fascinated me, and I am more enthused than ever. I have been unable to purchase all the materials needed for the quilts, but all my friends have been generous with patches, and your different patterns need various pieces of cloth, so I have been fortunate to keep going. MRS. L. MARZOLF, 19321 Coventry, Detroit, Mich. It is a pleasure to welcome all enthusiastic Corner member like you, Mrs. Marzolf, and I think you must have made more quilts from News patterns than anyone else. Perhaps I am not correct in assuming this, but no one has written in that she has made even as many as 20. I am happy to know that you enjoyed the exhibit so much, and if there is another one next year you ought to have many quilts to enter. Isn’t it nice that your friends have been so nice about seeing that you get patches? Every little scrap helps—don’t you think so? Please write again. Beauty in the Home Editor: Please enter my name as a member of the Beauty in the Home Quilt Club. Name……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………….. Street and number……………………………………………………………………………………………………. City…………………………………………………………. State………………………………………………………

Administrative

verify
yes
contributingInstitutions
MATRIX: Center for Humane Arts, Letters and Social Sciences Online at Michigan State University, Michigan State University Museum, Alliance For American Quilts
onlinePublisher
Quilt Index