Patchwork Quilt of Three Types


Ephemera Record: 1E-A3-B9C

Ephemera Object Description

title
Patchwork Quilt of Three Types
creator
  • Crumb, Edith
InstNameF003
  • Michigan State University Museum
description
This is part of Edith B Crumb's Quilt Club Corner Column. This particular column includes the story of why quilting is a women past time and what different patterns say about racial background, religion and American history.
dateOriginal
01-02-1936
timePeriod
1930-1949
city
Detroit
state
Michigan (MI)
country
United States
source
The Detroit News
type
Text
textType
  • Article
language
English
InstProjNameF003a
Detroit News History Project
rights
Contact MSU Museum.

File Information Upload

fileUpload
Name: 1E-A3-B9C-531-1936-01-02p24CarrieHall.tiff
Size: 14961175
Type: image/tiff
fullText
Patchwork Quilt of Three Types
Only Art Women Can Claim for Selves Author Says
Quilting bees, that were social events to their grandmothers, have become a social event to their grandmothers, have become a social diversion to American women in the past few years. The depression that limited more costly pastimes is believed by Carrie A Hall, the author of “The Romance of the Patchwork Quilt in America” to have brought back needlework “the only art which women could claim as their own.”
She noticed that the titles, Patchwork included three different types of quilts; the pieced quilt, showing the pieced patch set together in various ways, that was the type of nearly all quilts before 1750; the appliqued, patched or laid- on quilt, usually of floral design, that came into the mode about the middle of the eighteenth century and reached its highest vogue about 1950 and the quilted counterpane, usually white, where the decoration has been obtained by means of padded or corded quilting in elaborate design.

After making several quilts, she decided to collect patterns, and her 1,000 patterns will soon be added to the Theyer Museum of Art of the University of Kansas. These patterns of the colonial frontier women reveal, she says, the influence of racial backgrounds, religion, environment, and American history on these women, both in the names and design.
“The treck westward” she says, “was welcomed by most of the women, as it afforded them an opportunity to exchange quilt patterns with those from other sections of the country. Thus the original colonial patterns and those from the southern plantation. 

Administrative

verify
yes
contributingInstitutions
MATRIX: Center for Humane Arts, Letters and Social Sciences Online at Michigan State University, Michigan State University Museum
onlinePublisher
Quilt Index